Dr. Jonathan Kramer's Cell Tower Photo Gallery

Copyright 2000-2017 Dr. Jonathan Kramer

Image search results - "kmlt-fm"
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Panoramic view of the KMLT work site and antenna (Zoom shot)273 viewsThis close-up panoramic shot shows the transmitter site as seen (well, actually, not seen) from near the antenna site.
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Waterproofing the KMLT transmitter building302 viewsAnother view of the transmitter building and the waterproofing.
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Chris Hicks, Chief Engineer875 viewsChris Hicks is the Amaturo Group's RF engineer responsible for getting the new KMLT from dirt to on-the-air. He's (proudly) standing by the KMLT transmitter, which is temporarily installed in a trailer while the permanent underground transmitter building is being constructed nearby.1 comments
kmlt.panaram.041119.P101002.jpg
Panoramic view of the KMLT work site and antenna431 viewsThe trailer with the cable reel on top is the temporary transmitter location; the permanent underground transmitter building is behind the below the portable chain link fence behind the Bobcat. Zoom in on the ridge line to just make out the antenna location.1 comments
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Rebar cage for underground transmitter building - From ramp330 viewsAnother shot of the rebar that forms the soon-to-be underground transmitter building. The roadway in the background goes to the antenna site, adjacent to a camouflaged water tank.
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Rebar cage for underground transmitter building453 viewsHere's a good show showing how much rebar has been placed in the past 7 days (see the other photo in this gallery). The temporary transmitter trailer is shown in the background. Chris Hicks, the RF engineer responsible for making this site operational, is in the white shorts behind/above the excavation.1 comments
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Connecting the coax and ground strap to the antenna and post643 viewsThe transmitter coaxial cable (black) connects to the rigid coaxial rider inside the antenna support to feed the antenna. The very wide copper strap provides an unbroken ground connection between the antenna and the underground transmitter building about 700 feet away.
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Constructing the underground transmitter building for KMLT-FM360 viewsThis photograph shows the excavation and initial construction for the underground transmitter building to house KMLT-FM in Thousand Oaks, California. If you look carefully at the middle of the ridgeline you can just see the antenna and antenna post about 700 feet away.
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Looking at the antenna of an FM broadcast station899 viewsThis is the omni-directional cross-polarization antenna used at KMLT-FM in Thousand Oaks, California. It's a one-of-a-kind antenna design by SPX Corporation's Dielectric division.
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Looking at the antenna of an FM broadcast station565 viewsHere's a photograph of KMLT-FM's antenna and supporting post from a vantage point near the location.
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RF Safety testing at an FM broadcast station690 viewsThis is a photograph of RF engineer Joel Saxberg conducting signal strength measurements to determine the boundary to the general population/uncontrolled area around the antenna. Due to signal strength of the station, a fence will be placed around the antenna site to keep out the public out of the RF controlled zone.1 comments
 
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